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at the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. while this committee does not have oversight on the safety of u.s. nuclear plants, we do have to consider how events such as those at fukushima affected the ability of our nation's nuclear freedom, 104 reactors, to supply electricity. of course, these 104 reactors currently account for about 20% of the electricity that we use and what the future of nuclear energy will be as part of our nation's energy banks. events at fukushima are changing by the our. they are serious, and we are watching those events unfold on the other side of the world. our knowledge at best is incomplete. as we look forward to these experts and forming a committee on what they see at the plant, how would impact our nation must existing fleet of reactors, and answer questions the committee members might have. before i introduce our two -- our first panel, we have four witnesses, two on this first panel and two on the second trip before i introduced the panel, let me call on senator murkowski for comment. >> let me welcome those who are presenting today. i appreciate the time is
the equivalent of the pentagon. in the war against iraq, the u.s. war was committed from a headquarters in florida. they have a communications established with the commanders in the region in on the ground. host: what does it mean for the united states? guest: the and that is this is trying to hand off responsibility for the mission as quickly as possible. they wanted to do the things that only the united states could do, provide rapid command- and-control structure to get the operation going rapidly and effectively. and then to use the u.s. military firepower to destroy and dismantle gaddafi's command- and-control systems and particularly his surface to air missile capability. that is very important because no one -- everyone wants to minimize the danger to pilots enforcing the no-fly zone, and taking out those missile sites becomes very important to enable that. but that is the initial phase. that is starting to wind down if you look at the number of targets, the number of sites already it, i think this operation has been designed so that the u.s. could do the thing that the unit -- t
that more people had died in the villa, at what point does the u.s. say that now we are going to do something? how many people have to die? how many threats to their need to be to our energy needs? >> jake, i would simply say -- and remind you -- when you say that this has been a couple of weeks already, that is a remarkably short period of time from the time when colonel gaddafi was perceived to be, and was, in control of his country to the point where the international community is imposing substantial and punishing sanctions on him and his regime. the international community, speaking with one voice, calling for him to step down and cease the violence against his own people. we are talking about a matter of days and weeks that this has transpired within. i am aware of the ongoing violence. as the president just did with australia, we are again calling on the libyan regime to stoppin the in humane, brutal, unacceptable assaults on its own people. and for colonel gaddafi to step aside, as he has lost legitimacy in the eyes of his people and the world. >> i was not -- i was talking
and artillery and at the same time u.s. officials cautioned the united states and allies intend to limit their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think o
. there will be lots of different panel discussions across u.s. history. sunday night at 8:00 p.m., our guest is the president and ceo of the partnership for new york city. she is also a member of the federal reserve bank of new york. she will discuss the role of the federal reserve bank and other topics. thank you very much for being with us on an interesting friday morning. we will be back tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> the turn of events in libya today, the country has declared a cease-fire in their attacks on anti-government rebels, possibly in response to the action by the u.n. last night. the security council declared a no-fly zone of the country, voting authorize all necessary measures to protect the libyan people, including air strikes. the associated press reported about one hour ago that libya's foreign minister announced a ceasefire and stoppage of all military operations, saying it will take the country back to safety and ensure security for all libyans. he also criti
. in the u.s., they're not concerned so they lobby in a different direction. >> thank you. i will ask one more question. this is my second round. if you fast forward to today and look at the other end of the buchan, march 4, 2011, problems we have now, the chair has described moral hazard and the like. we talked about that. what did you do? i can anticipate your answers as i think you've given them, just to make it very clear on the record, what would you recommend march 4, 2011? >> briefly, first, i want to emphasize the things we have said. one, you need more capital. and that you need increasing capital has to be with the size of the bank's, the risk of too big to fail. it has to be that this distortion has to be eliminated. secondly, if you have a problem, you should play by the ordinary rules of capitalism. when you go into bankruptcy, you convert that to equity. it is really a version of the standard rules of capitalism. you look at the numbers back in citibank, they had enough long- term capital it was more than enough to manage them, more than we put in. the answer -- the resoluti
elsewhere. elsewhere in europe and the u.s.. -- the east germany disparity comes from the fact that east german women, upon leaving high school, seek college in jobs elsewhere. this can be explained in other ways. that is the case for many european countries. i would not jump to it as causing anything quite frankly right now. >> given your work at u.s.a.i.d. and the issues around trafficking and looking at what are those disparities going to mean in some of these other dynamics we can agree are really important and once we would like to avoid. short of women, the importation and trafficking of women in terms of bringing in -- >> but look at where trafficking is occurring today. it is more associated with high- income countries -- japan and brides.rea to importwho import those countries do not have a disparity. what does it mean? i do not know what it means, but i think we have jump to conclusions quite a bit. maybe in the end it will pan out some kind of impact. it is a moral issue, and i think that is why people are attracted to it. we wanted to be a security issue, but i think it may n
odyssey dawn? were opposition forces in libya informed by the u.s., the u.k. or france about the existence of these war games which may have encouraged them to actions leading to greater repression and a humanitarian crisis? in short, was this war against gaddafi's libya planned? or was it a spontaneous response to the great suffering which gaddafi was visiting upon his opposition? congress hasn't even considered this possibility. nato, which has now taken over enforcement of the no-fly zone, has more from an organization which pledged mutual support to defend north atlantic states from aggression, they've moved from that to military operations reaching from libya to the chinese border in afghanistan. north atlantic treaty organization. we need to know and we need to ask what role french air force general and current supreme allied commander of nato for transportation may have played in the development of operation southern storm and in discussions with the u.s. and the expansion of the u.n. mandate into a nato operation. what has been the role of the u.s. african command and central comma
of the u.s. debate in part of the transfers to the transitional council? >> we haven't made a decision about arming the rebels or arms transfers, so there has not been any need to discuss that at this point. we did discuss nonlethal assistance and discussed ways of trying to enable the transition national council to meet a lot of their financial needs and how we could do that through the international community, given the challenges that sanctions pose, but recognizing they obviously are going to need funds to keep themselves going. we discussed a broad range of matters and certainly their presentation, which some of you may have seen earlier today as to what kind of civil society and political structure they are trying to build until libya, are exactly in line with what they have consistently said were their goals, their commitment to democracy and to a very robust engagement with people from across the spectrum of libyans is, i think, appropriate. we do not have any specific information about specific individuals from any organization who are part of this, but, of course, we are gett
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9